ANTONIA PISCIOTTA ANTONIAECOPHOTO.COM

 

 

THEN — THE BITS & PIECES THAT MAKE ME WHOLE I was born into the world I photograph today, following the footprints of my ancestors. Settling in Sag Harbor in the late 1800's, they picnicked in the dunes, and found peace along the shores. My mother in her "campfire dress", fashioned after Native Indian attire, is a reminder of the close link between two cultures — those who inhabited Long Island for centuries, and the settlers, both living close to nature. As a child, I built sandcastles along the waters edge, peopling the motes with hermit crabs, and seining in Niniva Creek for minnows with a scrap of gauze. Following the paths of my parents (my father a painter, my mother a sculptress),
I graduated from the Rhode Island School of Design, studying under renowned photo-
grapher Harry Callahan. Receiving a degree in Graphic Design/Photography, I was honored to be selected to participate in the European Honors program in Rome, Italy. After a career in graphic design, heading my own design firm serving a wide variety of clients, including many noted New York publishers (Random House, McGraw-Hill, The New York Times, Harper and Row, EP Dutton), corporations (IBM, Technicon Instruments, Union Carbide) and non-profits (The College Board, The NY Botanical Garden, Montefiore Medical Center), I moved on to work as a photographer docu-menting the restoration and preservation of wetlands. My photographs have received numerous awards, and have hung in many galleries and museums in Westchester (The Katonah Museum) and on Long Island (The Heckscher Museum of Art). NOW — THE BITS & PIECES COME TOGETHER I've returned to the land of my roots; the shores, marshes, dunes and woodlands that nourish the spirit. As I photograph in this timeless space, I seek the subtle, quiet beauty in a world of extraordinary diversity — a world too often forgotten, overlooked or ignored. The subjects of some of these images, once commonly found, cannot be duplicated today, due to ongoing environmental degradation. Hopefully, with concerted efforts, prospects will brighten for reclaiming these compromised ecosystems.
 © 2013 ANTONIA PISCIOTTA